viernes, 28 de octubre de 2016

The 4th edition of the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology begins Friday 4 November 2016 in Lausanne, Switzerland

 Immunotherapies (medicines that use the body’s immune system to fight cancer) have proven to be a real breakthrough for cancer patients. They have provided longer survival as well as a better quality of life to patients with tumours that had few treatment options previously. 
At the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology starting Friday 4 November in Lausanne, Switzerland, around 600 experts and researchers from all over the world will gather to discuss advances in cancer immunotherapy, from cancer vaccines to antibodies and cell therapies.
Research has demonstrated that the immune system has tremendous potential to destroy tumours. Immunotherapy today works better for some types of cancer than for others. It is used by itself to treat some tumours, and combined with additional treatments for other cancers. Experts attending the 4th ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology will discuss how to best develop and individualise new strategies across tumour types.
Cancer vaccines that delay or stop cancer cell growth or cause tumour shrinkage, are only one of the exciting developments to be presented at the ESMO Symposium on Immuno-Oncology.
Oral presentations include:
Abstract 4O - Enhanced anti-cancer vaccines with a new epitope improvement system
Abstract 3O - Generation of Immune Checkpoint Knock-out Human Antigen-Specific T cells via CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Genetic Engineering
Abstract 1O - Association between single nucleotide polymorphisms and side effects in nivolumab treated NSCLC patients
Abstract 2O - Phase 1 study of ramucirumab (R) plus durvalumab (D) in patients (pts) with locally advanced and unresectable or metastatic gastrointestinal or thoracic malignancies (NCT02572687); phase 1a results
Abstract 5O - GBR1302-BEAT® Bispecific Antibody targeting CD3 and HER2 demonstrates a higher anti-tumour potential than current HER2-targeting therapies
The session on technological developments includes the following presentations:
  • Discovery and validation of next-generation biomarkers to guide cancer immunotherapy
  • Learning to read the adaptive immune repertoire
  • Deciphering the biology that drives response to immunotherapy
Poster highlights include:
Abstract 6PD - Improving the efficacy of PDL1 blockade by combination with oncolytic vaccines
Abstract 7PD - Oncolytic immunotherapy for enabling dendritic cell therapy
Abstract 8PD - Dendritic Cell production from allogenic donor Cd34+ stem cells and mononuclear cells: cancer vaccine
Abstract 9PD - PD-1 and PD-L1 expression in ovarian cancer
Abstract 10PD - Assessment of PD-L1 and CD47 expression together with tumour-associated TILs in resectable early stage NSCLC
Abstract 54PD - Preclinical Development of Tumour-Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) based Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy (ACT) for patients with advanced ovarian cancer
Abstract 12PD - MemoMAB, a novel technology for the banking and screening of cognate human immune-receptor repertoires
Major topics to be discussed at the Symposium are:
  • Biological therapy: Infectious agents at the service of immunotherapy
  • Immuno-oncology clinical studies across tumour types (melanoma, lung, bladder, breast, GI, CNS, ovarian…)
  • Cancer antigens
  • Antibody based immunotherapy: Checkpoint blockade and bio-specifics
  • Biomarkers response
  • Technological developments
  • Immuno-oncology meets molecular oncology
  • Beyond PD-1/PD-L1 axis blockade: Combinations or new molecules
  • Molecular controls of the immune system
  • Adoptive T cell therapy